Carter House

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Carter House

The Carter House, built in 1830 by Fountain Branch Carter, was caught in the center of one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. On the morning of November 30, 1864, U.S. General D. Jacob Cox commandeered the home as a command post as he directed the building of fortifications just south of the Carter home. At 4:00 p.m. when the battle began, the Carters sought refuge in their basement with their slaves and neighbors the Lotzes. Tod Carter, one of three Carter sons who had joined the Confederate army, was among the soldiers. He was found mortally wounded on the battlefield and brought to his home to die. This historic house and its outbuildings hold more than 1,000 Civil War bullet holes. The farm office is the most bullet-riddled building still standing from the Civil War. In 1935, the U.S. Department of Interior National Park Service designated the Carter House a National Historic Landmark. The Carter House, its out-buildings and eight acres are preserved and open to the public, including a gift shop and museum. A joint ticket that includes the Carter House, Carnton Plantation and Lotz House is available. Guided tours available daily. Admission charged. 
1140 Columbia Avenue
Franklin,  TN  37064

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